Corsair TX750W Power Supply

Aug 19th, 2008 | By

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Corsair TX750W Power Supply


Date
: 08/19/08 – 04:01:34 AM

Author
:

Category
: Power Supplies


Page 1 : Introduction

Corsair power supplies have long since been a favorite among computer enthusiasts, overclockers and casual users alike, and have built quite the reputation for being affordable, yet top-tier performing power supplies. Oddly, this will be Corsair's first appearance here at Overclockers Online with a power supply!

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While this will be Corsair's first power supply review with Overclockers Online, they certainly have brought with them a long list of credentials. Since 1994, Corsair has been producing performance memory modules targeting specifically demanding computing applications such as servers, work stations, and gaming computer systems. Since then, Corsair has expanded their reach to include power supplies, cooling products and flash memory modules.

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Today, in our hands we have Corsair's TX750W power supply. Corsairs TX line of power supplies is aimed directly at the value market, bringing to the table features and specifications found more commonly in much more expensive units. The TX series offers a single dedicated 12V rail, 80 Plus efficiency, a 140mm cooling fan for quiet operation and a price tag which rivals budget power supplies.


Page 2 : Features and Specifications

Here is what Corsair has to say about the TX750W power supply:

Enthusiasts looking for the optimal in price performance PSU technology will find the Corsair TX650W/TX750W series of PSUs will meet even the most demanding of required specifications.

The Corsair TX650W/TX750W power supplies are engineered using advanced technology and components typically found with high performance power supplies. With design features such as a dedicated, single +12V rail offer the maximum compatibility with the latest system components. Energy efficient circuitry capable of delivering greater than 80% efficiency ratings across 20%, 50%, and 100% load conditions make the TX family of PSUs ideal for the value/quality conscious enthusiast. With a large 140mm (120mm on TX650W) diameter temperature-controlled fan that is ultra quiet, yet still more than sufficient to cool the internals of the system, reliability and stability are no longer worries for the gamer, overclocker or enthusiast and high-end system builder.

Taking a look at specifications:

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A fairly typical list of specifications, and we of course would expect no less.

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Corsair's TX750W load distribution is worthy for a double take. 720W dedicated to the 12V rail alone on a 750W unit is quite impressive.


Page 3 : Package and Contents

Corsair's TX750W comes in a fairly standard size box, outfitted in a vibrant orange.

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Around the box, product artwork, features, and specifications are easily visible.

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Removing the parts from the box, Corsair has included a manual, screws, cables, and bagged in a like-suede bag, the power supply.

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The unit itself is fairly typically sized for power supplies nowadays and is finished in crinkled-black.

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Rugged, yet still a great looking unit.

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The large 140mm fan on the bottom of the unit should do an excellent job acting as an exhaust for the computer system, and cooling the power supply by drawing air from the case into the power supply and then through the perforated black end.

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With over 700W of the power supply dedicated to the 12V rail, you can bet Corsair intended on them to be used!

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Among the snake nest of wires are four 6 pin PCI-Express connectors with two detachable 2 pin connectors allowing compatibility for conventional 6 pin PCI-Express cards and newer 8 pin PCI-Express cards.

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Eight SATA connectors have also been included.

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Of course, then we have our 4 pin peripheral connectors, a total of eight of them that is.

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For the motherboard, we have a 20+4 pin motherboard ATX connector, and an EPS/ATX12V 4+4 pin connector.

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Opening the unit up, I was incredibly pleased to see the usage of a Yate Loon fan, model number D14BH-12 which spins at a maximum speed of 2800RPM producing 140 CFM and 48.5 dB of noise.

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The insides are fairly typical for a CWT built unit.

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First a Yate Loon fan and now a Matsushita capacitor? I have a good feeling about this unit!

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Page 4 : Testing Setup

Quite unlike any other PC component, properly evaluating a power supply involves much, much more than running a battery of tests or sitting down in front of a shooter for a few hours armed with a pen and a pad of paper. Although, we have the utmost appreciation for a few headshots coupled with explosions, power supply reviews call for much more. The general mantra for testing power supplies tends to fall somewhere in the ranges of loading the power supply up to the top, and letting it suffer. We here at Overclockers Online are inclined to agree. Accordingly, our testing methods have evolved to allow for more sophisticated and accurate testing.

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The dilemma here is: how to test a power supply without a computer system, but emulate a computer system? It is important to not forget that as much as we try to part from throwing a power supply into a computer system and watching how it performs, ultimately, what we are distancing ourselves from is precisely what we are trying to replicate. Simply, the ideal testing platform would indistinguishable from a computer system, but graced with the accuracies of an adjustable load. However, since do not have access to state of the art testing equipment, or the funds to purchase such equipment, we have built a custom load tester. While it does not offer adjustments in the thousandths of a decimal place, it does offer enough flexibility to test current day power supplies and beyond.

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Using thick high quality 16AWG wires throughout and equally high quality connectors and switches, we have sought to minimize resistance in the lines while maintaining flexibility. All it takes is a flip of a switch to turn a desired resistor on or off.

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A proper electronic load is a start, but we are going to be a bit more ambitious. A keystone piece of our testing mythology is the heat box. A system drawing 800W from a power supply produces quite a bit of heat, and to be testing such a power supply in an ambient environment is not only inconsistent with in-system applications but unrealistic and misleading. Our hotbox consists of nothing more than a case graciously donated to us from Silverstone. Recycling heat produced from the load tester using a series of controlled fans and a duct, we can control operational temperatures and push a power supply to its limits, or over.

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Using the heat and load, we will run a battery of five tests; three cold and two hot tests. The three cold tests consist of 50% load, 80% load and finally full load. Naturally, we will escalate the strain on the unit by adding heat in the hot tests. The final two tests are 80% load and full load at approximately 50°C or more.

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While the purpose and effects of 'burn in' are debated, doing so causes no harm. Prior to any testing, all units are run for a maximum period of one week without load. At best, this will stabilize the unit; at worst it takes a few hours off the unit's total life span.

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In our tests, we will do our best to adhere to ATX specifications including cross loading and criteria for testing. The presentations of our results are designed for ease of interpretation and conciseness.

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So, without any further delay, let us get started!


Page 5 : Testing

The aim of the cold test is to reflect ideal operational conditions where heat from the computer system is independent from the power supply. Still though, the term cold test would be misleading as things do get quite hot!

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Our first set of tests went by fairly well, the 5V and 12V rails were spot on with very minimal deviation. Constantly however, the 3.3V rail constantly fell within the '3%-5%' above category. Still though, for modern computer systems, it is the 12V rail we are most concerned about, and so far, things are looking good for it!

Next, is a personal favorite of mine, let's turn up the heat a bit.

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With the heat turned on, we are still seeing much of the same results. I must say, testing power supplies has turned my skewed my expectations. My disappointment isn't with the units performance – the Corsair TX750 is clearly a superb unit, however, I am disappointed my load tester couldn't do more do more harm!

Between both the cold and hot tests at full load, besides the fan pumping out a few hundred more rotations per minute, this unit simply shrugged off the load. Our next set of graphs will visually compare the Corsair TX750W at full load.

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This unit is a fairly typical sized power supply so it should have no trouble fitting into standard cases.

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With the power supply in place, mount with the included screws and you are ready to go!

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Page 6 : Conclusion

We have played with quite a number of exciting units here at Overclockers Online. Most of the time, by exciting we mean: can power an entire room filled with computers. But today, Corsair's TX750 has showed us a new meaning of exciting. Well besides this is the debut review for our brand new load tester, the TX750W can be had for about $100 dollars.

I would be hard-pressed to think of another unit which matches the TX750W in performance and price. I will admit, when news of Corsair's switch from Seasonic to Channel Well, I was not at all pleased, but given Seasonic's reputation, I am sure I was among the many who felt this way. However, as we have seen today, Corsair has not let performance slip, in fact I would go as far to say that Corsair's lineup of power supplies is as attractive as it has ever been. Oh, and did I not mention, the TX750W is priced at the lower reaches of the $100 dollar range?

For a unit that performs as well as those which double it in terms of cost, Corsair's TX750W is quite a contender. Uncommon to most budget power supplies, Corsair has neither fallen short on performance or features. Shrugging off each of our tests is a feat of its own, but matched with perks found commonly in much more expensive units such as a beautiful paint job, quality fan, fully sleeved wires and matching black Molex connectors, I must honestly say, this is pretty much as good as it gets.

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Advantages

  • Excellent performance

  • Value, value, value
  • Fully sleeved
  • Quiet
  • Beautiful paintjob

Disadvantages

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  • Overclockers Online would like to thank Corsair for providing a review sample of the TX750W. Overclockers Online would also like to thank SilverStone Technologies for providing the chassis for use in our load tester.

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