Cooler Master Hyper TX

Dec 18th, 2006 | By

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Cooler Master Hyper TX


Date
: 12/18/06 – 05:05:45 AM

Author
:

Category
: Cooling


Page 1 : Index

Manufacturer:
Cooler Master Co., Ltd.

Price:
$29.99USD (Newegg.com) / $31.10CND (NCIX.com)

If you have been following Overclockers Online, you will likely notice that there have been a few Cooler Master CPU coolers reviewed here within the last month and a bit starting with the Aquagate Viva followed by the Eclipse and the Mars. Today I will be finishing up this series of Cooler Master Coolers with an AMD cooler, the Hyper TX.

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Cooler Master is always adding new products to their line of CPU coolers and 2006 was no different. Cooler Master has been in the computer cooling market for a decade and 2006 was an indication that CM isn't slowing down at all. I have also been privileged to some information on upcoming CPU coolers from Cooler Master and let's just say, we can expect "BIG" things from Cooler Master in the not so distant future.

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The Hyper TX appears to look more like the standard CPU cooler straying from a unique design like that of the last two coolers I looked at. I will be looking at the Hyper TX for AMD which supports Socket AM2/939/754 but Cooler Master also offers the Hyper TX in an Intel variation as well. Let's get started, we begin with a look at the package that the Hyper TX comes in.


Page 2 : Package

I was anticipating a blister pack type enclosure for the Hyper TX to come in because of the Mars packaging and I was correct in that anticipation.

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Very much like the CM Mars, the Hyper TX comes completely secure in a very durable molded plastic package. The top is sealed with tape and the package keeps the cooler inside very secure. Fear not that something will happen to the fins during transport or handling because the cooler is quite snug in the molded plastic.

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With the package being clear, all graphics, and printing are on a single cardboard insert with the typical Cooler Master purple for the theme. The top right corner clearly identifies this Hyper TX as the AMD version.

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At the bottom of the package, Cooler Master lists some important specifications including listing the noise at a paltry 22dBA. 22dBA is a very low volume and if it lives up to the rating, this cooler should be near silent.

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The reverse of the package provides a complete look at the cooler including what appears to be a fin that will divert air from the fan down towards the motherboard. The top of the package on the rear continues with the listing of more specifications, you can find all those listed on the package on the next page.

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The bottom of the package at the rear is the same as the front listing more features and a list of CPU coolers which are compatible with the Hyper TX. This lists included every single Socket 754, 939, and AM 2 processor because they all use the same mounting method.


Page 3 : Specifications

I mentioned a few times that the package had a number of features and specifications listed on it from top to bottom. In reality, all that text from every side of the package has been summed up in this little chart from the Cooler Master web site:

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The fan is listed at 92mm pushing 41CFM at 1800RPM producing only 22dBA of noise. I am sure it is going to be quiet, that is no question, but is it going to be strong enough to move air through the fins fast enough to do an efficient job of cooling? As I have said before and will likely say again, I will reserve judgment until testing.

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Like the CM Mars, the Cooler Master web site offered up a diagram of sorts that outlines the airflow of this heatsink/fan combination. From this diagram it is evident that the boys at Cooler Master wanted this cooler to help bring some airflow to the motherboard. I will be sure to check the motherboard cooling ability in testing and the setup that I will be using for testing is the perfect design to test the effectiveness of this feature.


Page 4 : Package Contents

We have all but seen the Hyper TX through the package a couple pages ago but now we will get an up close and personal look at this compact cooler.

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Since the Hyper TX is only compatible with AMD, there isn't any additional mounting hardware in the package. The only other item present, aside from the Hyper TX itself, is a small single sheet instruction page. The cooler basically secures to the motherboard in the same manner as a stock AMD cooler so the instructions aren't elaborate but it is nice to have for someone who might not be comfortable to mounting coolers.

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When I first got the Hyper TX in my hands I was a little surprised with the relatively small size. In the world of "bigger is better", this cooler comes across as almost tiny. It is a pretty basic design with the 92mm fan blowing through the cooling fins with a shroud over the sides to keep the air moving in a single direction.

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That shroud then turns into a spoiler, if you will, that directs some of the exhaust air down towards the motherboard. In theory the design is really good because not only will we get the benefits of a stand up heatpipe design, but also the benefit of some air going down towards the motherboard.

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The spoiler directs the air down near the base of the cooler which we are looking at here. The contact patch of the base is copper and the top piece that sandwiches the heatpipes is a small aluminum block. The aluminum block also houses the mounting hardware.

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The heatpipes appear to be 6mm-7mm copper heatpipes and there are a total of three that stretch across the base and bend upwards to be cooled by the aluminum fins. The heatpipes are nicely spaced and directly over the center of the base which is best for heat transfer.

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The copper base comes pre-applied with thermal material as seen here. I will be doing the testing with this material but the next photo was taken after the testing to see the base once it was cleaned up.

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We can see that the base isn't the smoothest that I have seen, it looks very much like the base of the CM Eclipse, but it does appear to be flat as I checked that with a razor blade. I'll take flat over smooth any day or night of the week so the base does not bother me at all.

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Back near the top of the cooler we see the heatpipes poking out, just above the shroud. The fan is mounted on the shroud with rubber fasteners which should remove any chance of noise from vibration. The sides of the fan housing also have slits which allow the fan to draw more air in but also aid in keeping the fan quiet. Panaflo was the first to design a fan like this and it has been accepted to be a very good design so I am pleased to start seeing it on coolers.

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Looking head on into the fan we can see that the housing also "funnels" being larger at the opening than at the rear. This fan design appears to be very well thought out and despite the RPM that it spins at, should provide the appropriate airflow to cool the aluminum fins.

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Speaking of aluminum, I decided to try and take the shroud off to reveal those finely constructed aluminum fins and it was as easy as pulling it up a little bit and then off. Cooler Master has always had high-quality hardware and the Hyper TX is just another example of fine craftsmanship at the production level.

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The part number of the fan used on the Hyper TX is A9025-18RB-4BP-F1. I tried searching but found no additional information on this model number so we are left with the specifications Cooler Master has provided us on their web site and the package.


Page 5 : Installation

I am anticipating a straight forward installation section due to the mounting method of the Hyper TX. It simply clips on like the stock retail box AMD heatsink/fan so removal of the motherboard isn't even required. For those upgrading your stock unit with the Hyper TX, this is as straight forward an installation as it gets.

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Since the mounting method is the same as the stock unit, the stock retention piece remains in place and after cleaning the CPU, the motherboard is ready for the Hyper TX. I start with the AM2 motherboard I will be testing with, a DFI NF590 SLI-M2R/G.

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Due to the layout and position of the PWM area of the motherboard in correlation to the socket, mounting the Hyper TX in this orientation only makes sense as it will allow the shroud to direct the air from the cooler directly down onto the PWM area of the SLI M2R/G which does become quite hot under load. To install the cooler it is just a matter of clipping it on like the stock unit as you can see here.

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In this orientation, the fan then sits above the DIMM slots and as the right hand side of the above image shows, some modules didn't fit. The left half of the image is a Team Group module that doesn't come with heatspreaders installed and easily fits into place with the cooler already installed. The right shows a Corsair module that would not fit in the slot no matter how much twisting I tried.

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I then performed the testing on the AM2 platform and after removing the heatsink found that a perfect contact patch remained. This confirms my findings of a flat base as the thermal paste was evenly spread out and the base looks to have made perfect contact with the CPU. Now I will do a test fit on another DFI motherboard, the Socket 939 based LanParty Ultra-D.

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With the Ultra-D, the best orientation would be to have the shroud above the memory modules as it would direct some air flow over them during operation. The fan does stick out slightly but even in this setup, the top PCI-E X1 slot would be useable and the X16 PCI-E slot isn't even close to the fan so there is no problem there.

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The rear of the shroud clearly has a lot of space over the memory modules and I would anticipate this to be true on all motherboards whether they be Socket 939, 754 or AM2.

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I did run into an interesting problem with the 4-pin fan connector. As you can see, the extra pin is designed to hang off the right side of the fan header but with the Ultra-D, that is not possible because of the capacitor directly beside it. This is a motherboard fault more than anything but something to check before purchasing the Hyper TX for your setup.


Page 6 : Performance & Testing

Since this cooler is designed for either AMD or Intel and I have the AMD version, there will only be one setup for testing. My standard AM2 system will be used as the control and I will be putting the Hyper TX up against one of the CPU cooling kings at this time, the Thermalright Ultra-120.

Control:

CPU: AMD64 X2 4000+
MB: DFI LanParty NF590 SLI-M2R/G
RAM: Buffalo FireStix PC6400
GPU: PowerColor X1650PRO 256MB
PSU: OCZ GameXStream 700W
HD: Seagate SATAII 80GB 8MB NCQ
OS: Windows XP SP2 (with all updates)
Ambient Temperature: 22C~23C

CPU Cooling:

Stock AMD retail box cooler
Thermalright Ultra-120 w/Vantec Stealth 120mm fan (1500RPM / 53CFM)

Cooler Master Hyper TX

Here is a photo of the setup during the testing:

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I recently outlined my testing method in the CM Eclipse review and will simply quote that here:

To put load on the CPU I will run Orthos Beta (Prime95 based) which stresses both cores at the same time and generates pretty much the most heat a processor will see. Orthos will be run for a total of 3 hours and I will take 3 readings throughout that time. Those temperatures will be averaged out for the results graph. I will not only be taking CPU readings but also PWM readings as that will give us an indication of how much air is hitting the motherboard and cooling the components around the CPU socket. A combination of SmartGuardian and CoreTemp will be used for recording the temperatures.
Here are the results from the testing at the stock frequency of 2.0GHz with the default voltage of 1.350v set in the BIOS:

Stock 2.00GHz / 1.350v

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The Hyper TX is off to a great start easily outperforming the AMD stock cooler by a full 10C on Core0 and by 8C according to the motherboard CPU sensor. It has also managed to keep pace with the Ultra-120 fairly well showing only a slight advantage to the much larger and more expensive cooler. I would also like to point out the PWM temps and note that the Hyper TX keeps that area cooler than the Ultra-120 but the stock cooler does the best job in that area. This isn't really much of a surprise considering the RPM the stock cooler runs at. Let's see how well the Hyper TX does with the juice increased and the frequency cranked right up on this X2 4000+.

OC'ed 3.00GHz / 1.525v

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To say I am impressed with the results is quite the understatement. The simple fact that this system was Orthos stable for 3 hours or more at 3GHz with the Hyper TX is incredible. The ability to hold the temperature at 50C~55C according to CoreTemp is even more astonishing. The Ultra-120 was in for a fight with the Hyper TX and I really can't say enough about how it performed. The PWM temps were also noticeably less with the Hyper TX which indicates that although the fan may not be very powerful, it still does move some air in that area. Needless to say, some people are going to doubt these findings and that is why I have a screenshot because if I didn't see it myself, I wouldn't have believed it either.

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This is the first time I have been able to post results at 3GHz on air because no cooler, other than the Thermalright Ultra-120, has been able to hold my X2 4000+ stable long enough to get an accurate test at 3GHz. For the Hyper TX to perform as well as the Thermalright Ultra-120 is an incredible accomplishment. To top off this impressive performance is the fact that the Hyper TX operates at a whisper of noise. The fan on my PowerColor X1650Pro drowns out the Hyper TX with ease and I thought it was quiet. The noise level between the Hyper TX and the Ultra-120 with the Vantec Stealth 120mm fan was about the same and both are going to be the quietest fans in your case. It really is astonishing that the Hyper TX cools so well with little to no fan noise.


Page 7 : Conclusion

I normally don't get all giddy and child like when it comes to the conclusion of a review but very seldom am I this pleased with a product. The Cooler Master Hyper TX has literally knocked my socks off and got me spinning in my office chair. When I first received the Hyper TX, I saved it for last of my Cooler Master cooler reviews because I was expecting the least out of it. I was certainly wrong in my assessment and then some.

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The last CPU cooler that impressed me this much was the Ultra-120, being able to run my X2 4000+ at 3GHz completely Orthos stable was the topper. The fact that the Hyper TX does that as well for half the cost once you factor in a decent 120mm fan is nothing short of incredible. The noise is minimal if any at all, like I said, every video card or chipset fan on the market will drown the non-existent noise generated by the Hyper TX out.

It is hard to not recommend this cooler over any others based on my experience with it. The cooling performance is only a hair behind the Ultra-120 with a silent fan and noise produced by the Hyper TX is marginal to put it mildly. Installation is a breeze thanks to the "stock-like" retention system and removal of the motherboard is certainly not required. If youre in the market for additional CPU cooling, definitely have a look at the Hyper TX and see if it fits your needs.

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Advantages

Near silent operation
Outstanding cooling performance
Easiest installation in the business
Cheap like candy…and I am talking about cheap candy here folks

Disadvantages

There might be fitment issues with some boards, the DFI SLI M2R/G had a slight one

Overclockers Online would like to thank Cooler Master for the review sample.

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