Thecus N7700PRO Network Storage Server

Aug 22nd, 2010 | By Anthony

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NAS units by nature are heavily dependent on system software, operating systems, network settings, file systems and so on. With the built in recorded trace files, NASPT can simulate specified hard drive activity down to the distribution of random and sequential reads/ writes, the spread of data over individual platters, or locality, and a number of access characteristics to ensure consistency between all tests. For our purposes, we will be looking at four tests: HD Video, Office Productivity, Copy To NAS and Copy From NAS.

Thecus N7700Pro NAS

For clarity, the above image visually represents how a system of disks is accessed, where the vertical axis represents location on the system and the horizontal access represents the total duration elapsed of the test. Our look into IOzone and Iometer have given us an excellent idea of what kind of numbers to expect when it comes to pure or sequential access however real world hardly ever can be judged on theoretical data. The orange and red lines should already be very familiar and are from a recorded trace of moving a single large file and would represent what could almost be near ideal sequential access. The grey line on the other hand is more representative of sequential access in the real world. Lastly, the mess of the white access pattern is what a real world random access would look like. It is neither entirely random nor entirely sequential, but exhibits traits of each. In Intel’s NASPT, the Office Productivity benchmark models this and is composed of a multiple small but varying sized files stored in different locations and access is comprised of both reading and writing.

Thecus N7700Pro NAS

Thecus N7700Pro NAS

Thecus N7700Pro NAS

Formatted in RAID 0 the system managed 81 MB/s followed by RAID 5 then JBOD at 80 MB/s and 51 MB/s respectively.

Thecus N7700Pro NAS

Thecus N7700Pro NAS

Thecus N7700Pro NAS

Our Copy To NAS or write tests were a bit more consistent fwhere RAID 5 and RAID 0 both managed just above 85 MB/s followed by JBOD with 82 MB/s. For the most part our NASPT results are fairly in line with what we’ve been seeing so far, but perhaps correlate better with our IOZone results.

Finally, our last two benchmarks for this section: HD Video playback and Office Productivity.

Thecus N7700Pro NAS

Thecus N7700Pro NAS

Thecus N7700Pro NAS

This test consists of reading a single file approximately 4800 MB in size and for the most part consists of sequential reading. Both the RAID 0 and RAID 5 configurations managed read speeds as we’ve come to expect.

Thecus N7700Pro NAS

Thecus N7700Pro NAS

Thecus N7700Pro NAS

Our last test for NASPT is the office productivity test. Multiple small files, random access and the combination of both read and write is typically the death of most NAS devices (in terms of performance, of course) which pass through our hands. It is really the best true measure of daily usage as a localized storage and I’m pleased to say, the TS-559 Pro managed this better than most averaging 36 MB/s for RAID 5 and just under 40 MB/s for RAID 0.

Thecus N7700Pro NAS

Before we head over to the last section of testing we are going to finish up our look at NASPT with a simple graph showing average observed throughput during the duration of each test. For the most part the numbers reflect our prior findings, except it should be noted that the calculations of the averages here take in account the systems’ overall cache effect, hence the above possible Gigabit throughput reported in the Copy To NAS section. Negating the data points caused by caching, the N7700Pro achieved a read throughput of about 80 MB/s range, a write throughput of around 80 MB/s to 90 MB/s and with random data of small files, just under 40 MB/s.

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